Legislation - State and Federal
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Horses Have Road Rights Pamphlet - WI State Statutes (PDF)

Wisconsin Equine Economic Impact Study Results Brochure 2008 (PDF)

Complete Wisconsin Equine Economic Impact Study Results 2008 (PDF)
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AHC WASHINGTON UPDATE...

June 21, 2018

Farm Bill, Take 2!  House Lawmakers Pass Ag Legislation, Boost Animal Health Programs

In the wake of a failed vote on the 2018 farm bill on May 18 – largely precipitated by controversy surrounding unrelated immigration policy issues - on June 21, House lawmakers revisited the legislation and finally passed the Agriculture and Nutrition Act of 2018 (H.R. 2) by a vote of 213 to 211.  Since Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) announced that he plans to pass companion legislation in the upper chamber before July 4, Congress appears to be poised to finalize a bill prior to expiration of Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs on September 30.  During meetings on Capitol Hill the week of June 11, multiple senate offices echoed a commitment to the deadline, reminding members of the horse industry that the chamber is prepared to work into the August recess to complete its legislative business prior to the mid-term elections in the fall.         
 
Fortunately for the horse industry, the $868 billion, five-year package includes provisions addressing some of AHC’s top priorities:  authorization of a new National Animal Disaster Preparedness and Response (NADPR) program; additional support for the National Animal Health Laboratory Network; and creation of the National Animal Health Vaccine Bank that will prioritize risks posed by Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD), among other threats. 
 
A preliminary review of the bill shows that although lawmakers generally met industry’s full funding request - totaling $250 million for the priority issues outlined above - for FY2019 only, the bill reduces those funds during subsequent fiscal years.  For example, the horse industry and its partners requested $70 million each year to fund the NADPR, but received $30 million for 2020 and beyond.  Fortunately for the horse industry, the final bill authorizes $150 million for a “priority FMD vaccine bank,” opening the door for funding vaccines that will mitigate other diseases.
 
AHC will continue to advocate for industry priorities as the legislation moves forward.  To view a copy of the legislation, please click here: https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr2/BILLS-115hr2rh.pdf.   

View Article on AHC Website

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AHC WASHINGTON UPDATE...

June 8, 2018

Successful Barr Amendment Gives $5 Million Boost to Equine-Assisted Therapy for Veterans
 

On Friday, June 8, the House of Representatives approved H.R. 5895, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 Energy and Water, Legislative Branch, and Military Construction and Veterans Affairs (VA) Appropriations Act.  Per an amendment offered by Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY), the House bill increases funds for Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) by $5 million.  Specifically, the Barr amendment directs appropriators to “transfer $5 million from the VA’s Health Administration’s (VHA) Medical Community Care Account to the Medical Services Account for the explicit use for the VA’s Adaptive Sports Grant (ASG) program, equine assisted therapy.” On Monday, June 4, AHC sent a letter of support to House Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions (R-TX) urging the committee to rule the Barr amendment “in order” so that it could be adopted on the House floor.
 
By way of background, Congress has already endorsed robust EAAT measures by approving increased funds for EAAT within the FY2018 omnibus.  By approving the Barr Amendment to FY 2019 appropriations, Congress re-enforces an important commitment to our nation’s warriors when they return from combat.  According to a clinical study conducted in conjunction with Columbia University, an estimated 14% to 30% of U.S. veterans suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).  Congress can help mitigate PTSD by boosting EAAT. 
 
The U.S. horse industry employs nearly one million Americans and contributes $122 billion to Gross Domestic Product (GDP).  EAAT programs not only provide valuable services for U.S. veterans, but the operations also support jobs for a growing number of working Americans, and “second careers” for horses who would otherwise retire from racing or other working roles.  According to a 2017 economic impact study, EAAT supports more than 6,700 jobs and generates $311.7 million in annual revenues in the U.S.  If you have questions related to AHC’s support for Rep. Barr’s Amendment to H.R. 5895, please contact Bryan Brendle, AHC’s Director of Policy and Legislative Affairs, at 202-296-4031. 

View Article on AHC Website

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New Lighting for Buggies Signed Into Law

By Jenessa Freidhof | The Country Today | jenessa.freidhof@ecpc.com

Gov. Scott Walker recently signed into law Assembly Bill 475, legislation that updates light requirements on slow-moving, animal-drawn vehicles. Authored by state Sen. Jerry Petrowski, R-Marathon, and Rep. John Spiros, R-Marshfield, the bill aims to improve road safety for all drivers.

“Every year we are seeing fatalities where somebody comes up on a buggy and an accident occurs. The fatali-ties have such a devastating effect not only on the Amish family, but on the people that are involved in the accident. Our goal in this is to create some type of safety measure that will help these buggies be seen, especially in the evening and nighttime hours or when there is fog out,” Petrowski said.

Rep. Bob Kulp, R-Stratford, aided Spiros with drafting the legislation and met with several local Amish communities to discuss the goals of the bill. The bill comes after legislators heard from people about the need for new requirements on these vehicles.

“I think anybody that has driven in our rural parts of the state with a lot of Amish or old-order Mennon-ite communities and their horse-drawn vehicles has come upon them in inclement weather or at night and some of them are not lighted well,” Kulp said. “It is really a safety concern from the motor vehicle driving population being able to see these buggies.”

Meeting with local Amish communities, Kulp said he started a conversation with them on why better visibility of their buggies is necessary, while still being sensitive to the culture.

“I bring a unique perspective to the issue because old-order Mennonite and Amish are actually my heritage; my mom was Amish and my dad was old-order Mennonite. My first language was Pennsylvania Dutch so I could actually go to some of the communities and have conversations with them, although briefly, in their native tongue,” he said.

Kulp said the response to the new law has been mixed, with some people feeling it did not go far enough from a visibility and enforcement perspective.

The law requires slow-moving, animal-drawn vehicles to have one white headlight and two red rear lights, with the new requirement of an additional rear flashing yellow or amber strobe light. The light needs to be visible from 500 feet away.

“In the fog or at night, you can come upon these buggies so fast that you don’t see them ahead of time,” Petrowski said. “This yellow or amber strobe that we would like to see mounted on the buggies I think really will allow people to see them from a long distance. I think it will save lives and will make our roadways much safer in rural areas.”

“They have six months to comply to the law and then it is basically a warning type system as opposed to citation,” Kulp said.

Kulp said this seemed to be the correct approach rather than a more punitive approach right away. He is hopeful that with the dialogue started with the communities before the law was passed, the communities affected will be more accepting of the requirements.

“If we see that (warnings) don’t work, we will likely have to do some things where you have citations beyond warnings, but I think this is the right place to start,” he said. “I think there are only about a half-dozen groups of the most restricted congregations that will end up having a problem with this and they may end up bucking it to the point where they could potentially take it to the Supreme Court, which is what they did with slow-moving-vehicle signs a couple of decades ago.”

Although motor vehicle and animal-drawn vehicle collisions are relatively rare, they are usually very serious and Kulp said being proactive with the issue is important.

“You never want to say there is not a problem when you can’t know how many people were very close to an incident,” he said. “It also goes beyond that to the fright factor.”

Kulp said not only is it people’s reactions to avoid the collision, but the reaction to the population that made being proactive about the issue important. He said he is hopeful that the affected communities will be accepting of the legislation and that the dialogue started between people will help them to work together better in this regard.

“When you pop over a hill and it is dark and foggy and suddenly you see this vehicle, what goes through the mind of the person driving the motor vehicle is ‘those crazy Amish people, why can’t they figure this out.’ It turns into a class or culture issue that really doesn’t need to be there and that was really one of my appeals to the Amish community,” he said. “I told them I get why they want to be fading into the woodwork; it is part of their nature. But this is about being responsible and putting yourself into the shoes of the English — to use their vernacular — as to what goes through their minds when they come across a buggy that isn’t lit up well.

“I tried to get the communities to see that this is an important way that they can live in peace with their neighbors and their friends around them. I think that is something that they have not always thought about so it was an opportunity for me to point this out to them — not to be flashy, but to be responsible citizens in a community that has a lot of different people and vehicles.”

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AHC WASHINGTON UPDATE...


February 18, 2018

AHC Meets with Department of Transportation, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The American Horse Council met with Department of Transportation (DOT), Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) Deputy Administrator and leadership team this week in response to a letter sent to Secretary Chao on January 28th, 2018. AHC staff went to DOT headquarters to raise the industry’s concerns and solicit clarification on how the existing regulations should be interpreted, and how those interpretations are affecting the horse industry.

The AHC expressed the industry’s interest in an increased level of stakeholder outreach, the lack of uniform interpretations nationwide, the applicability of various exemptions already in place, and the appropriate avenues for future legislative and regulatory efforts. AHC shared specific situations where rodeo, racing, competition and recreational sectors have interacted with law enforcement concerning commercial regulations.

The DOT informed the AHC that a new website specifically tailored to the agricultural industry will be unveiled in the next week, with a dedicated contact for agricultural questions, and they will begin to develop a F.A.Q. to more clearly address the questions which they receive.

The DOT members present did clarify that trailer drivers not engaged in business are not subject to Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) regulations, specifically where additional licensing is concerned. Regardless of weight, it was the interpretation of those present that going to an event that may issue prizes does not necessarily constitute commercial activity. As long as participation in the competition itself is not a component of the business with which that driver or the vehicle are regularly engaged, and expenses for said trip are not deducted for tax purposes, a CDL is not required to operate the CMV in question. Those interpretations, as are all CMV regulations, are specific to federal regulations, and state regulations may be less forgiving.

The AHC is excited about the opportunity to develop this relationship with DOT-FMCSA. The equine community should look forward to utilizing these lines of communication in the future to assure industry wide compliance and protection of individuals driving both commercially and recreationally. The AHC encourages the industry to reach out to state law enforcement to determine how best to comply with the state regulations. As additional information on this subject becomes available, the AHC will share that with our members as quickly as possible.

Visit http://www.horsecouncil.org/eld-mandate-cdl-requirements/ for AHC materials on this subject. Please contact the AHC with questions or concerns.

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AHC Requests Clarification from DOT

January 31, 2018

The upcoming Electronic Logging Device deadline has sparked an animated discussion within the horse industry. The AHC would like to note that these are federal regulations that are left to state officials to be enforced. This division of responsibilities, and potentially divergent interpretation, is the basis for the sense of confusion felt across the industry.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) have told the AHC that the regulatory changes within the department are several years behind schedule. As such, addressing the current state of compliance is critically important to the industry and the continuation of the equestrian sport and way of life.

In that light, the AHC is working collectively with the larger livestock industry to seek more concise and plainly presented expectations for the equine industry to follow. The following letter was sent to Secretary Elaine Chao with the Department of Transportation in the hopes that DOT will address these concerns. Depending on the response from Secretary Chao and DOT, AHC is prepared to pursue new regulatory and legislative options that ensure the continuity and protection of the equine industry. View the letter here.

Please contact the AHC if you have any further questions.
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AHC UPDATE - ELD MANDATE & CDL REQUIREMENTS

There has been quite a bit of information going around about the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate. The AHC felt that it should provide some educational content about the ELD mandate, and also what requirements are needed for a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).

Linked below are two brochures for your information.

ELECTRONIC LOGGING DEVICE MANDATE - HOW WILL IT AFFECT YOU? - (PDF)

COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE - HOW DO I KNOW IF I NEED ONE? - (PDF)

If you have any questions, please contact us. Thank you!

Ashley Furst
American Horse Council
1616 H Street NW, 7th Floor
Washington, DC 20006
202-296-4031
www.horsecouncil.org

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AHC WASHINGTON UPDATE

Senate Passes Tax Bill, Moves to "Conference" to Negotiate Final Package

December 4, 2017

Copyright © 2017 American Horse Council

Permission to pass on the AHC Washington Update to your members, readers, or others is granted on the condition that it is forwarded in its original form or directly linked with the AHC logo and a link to the AHC website.

Senators scrambled Saturday, December 2, to muster the necessary 51 votes to pass its version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, effectively laying down a marker to jump start negotiations with the House of Representatives on a final package.  While details related to the senate bill continue to emerge, please see the below highlights of key provisions that will impact the equine industry.  Many of these provisions diverge from the House-passed version and could be subject to changes during the House and Senate conference, which congressional leadership will organize this week: 

Business Provisions

  • Corporate Tax Rate: The senate bill delays reduction of the corporate tax rate from 35% to 20% until 2019. By contrast, H.R. 1 provides an immediate corporate tax cut, effective in 2018.  Lawmakers will have to bridge this gap during the conference committee. 
  • Small Business:  The senate vehicle establishes a 23% deduction for small business income of “pass-thru entities,” or small companies which opt to pay taxes under the individual rate.  Senators included this deduction to address concerns from lawmakers who claimed that previous versions of the bill did not create sufficient tax relief for small business.     
  • Expensing: While the House bill and a previous version of the senate vehicle provided 100% bonus depreciation, the final senate bill appears to modify treatment of bonus depreciation to “phase down … the percentage from 100% by 20% per calendar year.”  AHC largely supports the House treatment of expensing, which according to Hill sources, includes a broad legislative definition to allow full expensing of horses.     
  • Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) – According to Hill sources, the senate vehicle preserves a 20% corporate, alternative minimum tax.  The House bill repeals the unpopular provision altogether, laying the groundwork for a major discussion point during negotiations for a final package. 
  • Name and Logo Royalties:  The senate bill strikes a provision from a previous version of the bill that treated “name and logo royalties” as unrelated business taxable income.
  • Wagering Losses:  A previous version of the senate bill states that it amends the existing tax code provision that addresses treatment of gambling winnings, without specifying how.   The current senate vehicle does not appear to clarify this provision, which AHC will continue to monitor. 

Individual Provisions

  • Estate Tax: The Senate preserves it commitment to double the estate tax exemption, currently valued at $5.49 million for individuals, without full repeal.  By contrast, H.R. 1 eliminates the estate tax within six years of enactment.                       
  • State and Local Taxes (SALT) – Senators agreed to an itemized deduction for up to $10,000 in state and local property taxes, which resembles a compromise included in the House bill. 
  • Mortgage Interest: The senate version will cap the deduction for mortgage interest indebtedness at $1 million.  H.R. 1, however, establishes a $500,000 cap on interest from new home purchases, a provision drawing criticism from the homebuilders. 
  • Charitable Contributions:  In cases of individual cash contributions, the senate bill increases the percentage-limit deduction from the current rate of 50% to 60%. 

Heading to the Finish Line

When congressional leaders appoint conferees, who will be recruited from the Senate Finance Committee and the House Ways and Means Committee, serious negotiations will begin, with a goal of presenting a final package to the president for his signature before Christmas.  To view a copy of a four-page table outlining highlights related to the various revenue impacts of the bill’s key provisions, please click here:  http://www.horsecouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Table-Revenue-Impacts.pdf​

For more information related to tax reform issues, please contact Bryan Brendle, Director of Legislative Affairs, at bbrendle@horsecouncil.org.  

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House Ag Appropriations Committee Vote on Horse Slaughter Defunding

July 13, 2017

Copyright © 2017 American Horse Council
Permission to pass on the AHC Washington Update to your members, readers, or others is granted on the condition that it is forwarded in its original form or directly linked with the AHC logo and a link to the AHC website.

The House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations voted July 12 against an amendment that Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.) and Rep. Charlie Dent (R-Pa.) had offered to defund the USDA’s inspection of horse slaughter, a renewal of what was effectively a ban on the practice

Please click on the link below to read the article in its entirety.

AHC - HOUSE AG APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE VOTE ON HORSE SLAUGHTER DEFUNDING
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USDA-Animal Care Provides Horse Protection Act Progress Report

June 30, 2017

On June 29, 2017, Bernadette Juarez, Deputy Administrator of APHIS-Animal Care, released an open letter to the management of horse shows, exhibitions, sales, as well as Horse Industry Organizations and Associations (HIOs), and the owners, trainers, exhibitors, and custodians of horses engaged in Horse Protection Act (HPA) covered activities.

In it she provides a progress report on the efforts to strengthen the HPA inspection program, their working relationship with the industry, and HPA enforcement. She applauded the HIOs that have made refinements to their processes to achieve their new standards, including the updated inspection guidance intended to promote consistency throughout the entire industry. That inspection guidance was posted on their website, found here, along with videos that depict the inspection process.

She ended her letter by acknowledging that “A consistent and thorough inspection process coupled with management’s commitment to fulfilling its responsibilities under the HPA are essential for ensuring exhibitors have clear expectations and can confidently present horses for inspection and participate in HPA-covered events.”

On March 30, 2017, Representatives Ted Yoho (R-FL) and Kurt Schrader (D-OR) re- introduced the Prevent All Soring Tactics Act of 2015 (HR 1847) (PAST Act) in the House of Representatives.   The bill is intended to strengthen the Horse Protection Act (HPA) and prevent the soring of Tennessee Walking Horses, Racking Horses, and Spotted Saddle Horses.  The bill is supported by the American Horse Council and most national horse show organizations. The AHC urges all members of the horse industry to contact their Representative and ask them to support the bill and become a co-sponsor. 

For more information on the Horse Protection Act and the practices used to enforce it, please visit https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalwelfare/SA_HPA .

The complete letter can be read here. Please contact the American Horse Council with any further questions regarding the HPA or the PAST Act.

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Legal Transportation of Horses Across State Lines

Please take a moment to read an article entitled "Are you legal transporting horses across state lines?" by Source: Text By Kristy Vanderwende • Design By Joselyn Leonhart • Photos By Larry Williams of InStride Edition. The WHC would like to thank InStride Edition, www.InStrideEdition.com for allowing us to share this excellent article on legal transportation of horses across state lines.

Click here to read this very informative article.

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State

WI LRB-1643/1: Regarding animals taken into custody (Not yet a Wisconsin Bill)

Click here to read the full text of the proposed bill: WI LRB-1643/1 Proposed Bill (PDF)

Sponsored by Senator Tim Carpenter

The Wisconsin Horse Council has registered opposed to this bill due to the inclusion of Section 16. 173.23 (1) (e) The animal has an implanted microchip for identification or assurance of implantation of a microchip for identification is given by prepayment.

The Wisconsin Horse Council is a strong supporter of animal identification if so chosen by the animal owner.


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Federal

Pending Federal Legislation Under Review

Great Source for Legislative Issues & Policies is the American Horse Council

www.horsecouncil.org

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UPDATE!


AHC WASHINGTON UPDATE - 3/31/17


On March 30, 2017, Representatives Ted Yoho (R-FL) and Kurt Schrader (D-OR) re- introduced the Prevent All Soring Tactics Act of 2015 (HR 1847) (PAST act) in the House of Representatives.   The bill is intended to strengthen the Horse Protection Act (HPA) and prevent the soring of Tennessee Walking Horses, Racking Horses, and Spotted Saddle Horses.  The bill is identical to the bill introduced last Congress and is supported by the American Horse Council and most national horse show organizations.

Please click on the link below to read the entire article on the AHC's website.

Legislation to Eliminate Soring Introduced in the House

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AHC WASHINGTON UPDATE - 1/13/17

Today, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) announced final regulations governing enforcement of the Horse Protection Act (HPA). The HPA was passed in 1970 to stop the cruel practice of “soring” horses that was occurring in some sectors of the Tennessee Walking Horse, Racking Horse and Spotted Saddle Horse industry.

Please click on the link below to read the entire article on the AHC's website.

USDA Announces Final Horse Protection Act Rule

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H.R. 845:  National Forest Service Trail Stewardship Act of 2015

Full Title: The bill would direct the Forest Service to take several actions to help address the current trail maintenance backlog that is adversely impacting all trail users on many national forests, including equestrians.

Full Text of Bill | More Information

NOVEMBER 17, 2016

AHC WASHINGTON UPDATE
Copyright © 2016 American Horse Council

Permission to pass on the AHC Washington Update to your members, readers, or others is granted on the condition that it is forwarded in its original form or directly linked with the AHC logo and a link to the AHC website.


Congress Passes National Forest Service Trail Stewardship Act 

Today, the Senate passed the National Forest Service Trail Stewardship Act of 2015 (H.R.845 S.1110). This follows House passage of the bill earlier this fall.  The bill, introduced by Representatives Cynthia Lummis (R-WY), Tim Walz (D-MN) and Senators Mike Enzi (R-WY) and Michael Bennet (D-CO), would direct the Forest Service to take several actions to help address the current trail maintenance backlog that is adversely impacting all trail users on many National Forests, including equestrians. 
The American Horse Council, Backcountry Horsemen of America, and the Wilderness Society were significantly involved in the creation and passage of this bill.

The AHC is pleased Congress has approved this important legislation.  The AHC would like to thank Representatives Cynthia Lummis (R-WY), Tim Walz (D-MN) and Senators Mike Enzi (R-WY) and Michael Bennet (D-CO) for their leadership and work to pass this bill.

The bill directs the Forest Service to develop a strategy to more effectively utilize volunteers and partners to assist in maintaining national forest trails.  It will also provide outfitters and guides the ability to perform trail maintenance activities in lieu of permit fees.   Additionally, the bill will address a liability issue that has discouraged some national forests from utilizing volunteers and partner organizations to help perform trail maintenance and will direct the Forest Service to identify and prioritize specific areas with the greatest need for trail maintenance in the national forest system.

In the current fiscal environment it is unlikely Congress will appropriate additional funds to directly address the trail maintenance backlog. This bill will help improve trail maintenance without the need for additional funding. 

The President is expected to sign the bill into law in the near future.

View Article on AHC Website

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H.R. 1518: Prevent All Soring Tactics of 2013

Full Title: To amend the Horse Protection Act to designate additional unlawful acts under the Act, strengthen penalties for violations of the Act, improve Department of Agriculture enforcement of the Act, and for other purposes.

Full Text of Bill | More Information

AHC PAST Act Hearing Testimony

Endorsements for PAST Act

AHC PAST Act Frequently Asked Questions

Wisconsin co-sponsors: None

On April 11, 2013, assigned to committee House Energy and Commerce sub-committee Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade

H.R. 1094: Safeguard American Food Exports Act of 2013

Full Title: To prohibit the sale or transport of equines and equine parts in interstate or foreign commerce for human consumption.

Full Text of Bill | More Information

Wisconsin Cosponsors: Mark Pocan

On 3/12/13 referred to committees: House Agriculture

Wisconsin committee member Congressman Reid J Ribble and House Energy and Commerce

Wisconsin committee member: None

S. 541: A bill to prevent human health threats posed by the consumption of equines raised in the United States

Full Title: A bill to prevent human health threats posed by the consumption of equines raised in the United States.

Full Text of Bill | More Information

Wisconsin Cosponsors: None

On 3/12/13 referred to committee: Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

Wisconsin committee member: Senator Tammy Baldwin


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Announcements and Notices

WHC Horsemen's Calendar of Upcoming Events

Want to know what equine related events and activities are going on in your area? Please click on the heading above to access a list of up-coming events and a form that you can complete and send to us to have your equine related activity added to this new calendar!

WHC Classified Ads

Exclusively for Wisconsin Horse Council members........

We are offering FREE classified ads on our website and in the newsletter!

Recreational Trail Aids (RTA) Program

This is a federal program administered in all states. Municipal governments and incorporated organizations are eligible to receive reimbursement for development and maintenance of recreational trails and trail-related facilities for both motorized and non-motorized recreational trail uses.

Legal Transportation of Horses Across State Lines

WHC would like to share this important information with you courtesy of InStride Edition, www.InStrideEdition.com. Please click here to access this excellent article.

Attention All WHC Members

Important information for all WHC Members! Please click below to read the details.

Great News for WHC Members!

Did you know that if you are a member of the Wisconsin Horse Council (WHC), you are also eligible for the American Horse Council's (AHC) Advantage Plan?


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Wisconsin State Horse Council | P.O. Box 72 | 121 S. Ludington St. | Columbus, WI 53925
Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. | Phone: 920-623-0393 | Fax: 920-623-0583 | E-mail: info@wisconsinhorsecouncil.org | Form login